Contest: Win a 200GB Binverse account! (UPDATE)

Now that I have a speedy internet connection at home, I’ve been looking for ways to properly use all that speed. Previously, I’d been using Bittorrent to download movies Linux distributions, but brute-force as that protocol is, it never really maxed out my 120 mbps line. So I moved to Usenet instead. I’ve been trying out premium Usenet provider Binverse, and the results are very promising. They contacted me about possibly doing a giveaway, so I thought I’d offer you a chance at winning a free account.
More Contest: Win a 200GB Binverse account! (UPDATE)

High speed internet? Make sure your router can keep up!

Recently, I upgraded my broadband connection. Bits now flow into my house at 120 mbps. Well, almost. The cable modem provides that speed, but as it turns out, my router doesn’t quite route that fast. It maxes out at around 20 mbps. And this is an expensive SOHO router. Whenever routers are reviewed, the focus is usually on features and wireless performance, but there’s another metric that’s getting more important as home internet connections are speeding up.
More High speed internet? Make sure your router can keep up!

Roy | February 26, 2011 | English,Gadgets | Comments (4)
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Browsers are pretty quick at scaling images

I used to be a real nitpicker when it came to preparing images for the web. I’d laugh at people using large images in web pages, showing them in a smaller format by setting the width and height properties.

In the days before broadband was everywhere it was bad karma to do this, because a large image file would take a long time to download. You needed to prepare the image at the size you were going to be displaying it. Nowadays, things are a little different.
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Testosterone may be the biggest polluter of all

tesla-roadsterLast year, Intel’s Atom series of microprocessors did something that no other computer product had done before it. It was the first new, innovative product that was significantly slower than other recent offerings. To the surprise of pretty much the whole industry, Atom-powered netbooks caught on. For the first time, consumers were buying slower computers. Because they were fast enough for most common tasks. And because they were light, cheap and used very little energy.
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